Light Meter Tutorial – Photography/Videography 101 with Steve DiCasa

00:00
what’s up everybody Steve de casas here
00:02
with another de casa film tutorial and
00:04
this time I’m at the YouTube space this
00:07
is awesome I got a chance to unlock the
00:09
space and use it and if you want to do
00:11
that too for your YouTube channel go
00:12
check it out
00:13
I’m in New York City there’s one in Los
00:15
Angeles there’s one in like Tokyo London
00:17
something like that go check it out it’s
00:19
awesome so anyway this is going to be
00:20
part two of my filmmaking 101 series the
00:24
light meter and it’s the one thing I
00:26
didn’t talk about in my big tutorial my
00:29
50 minute long tutorial that I put up
00:31
about a year and a half ago DSLR basic
00:34
settings if you have never touched a
00:36
camera before and you’re looking to
00:37
learn photography or videography go
00:39
check that out I’ll annotate to it right
00:41
here in this little corner so check it
00:43
out I’m going to be using terminology
00:45
from that video in this video so if you
00:48
haven’t seen it and if you’re looking to
00:49
start fresh and for some reason you’ve
00:51
found this video first go to that one
00:54
learn about photography and videography
00:56
learn about shutter speed f-stop ISO
00:59
depth of field and then come right back
01:01
here I’ll wait for you and then we’ll
01:04
talk about the light meter so welcome
01:06
back so this is part 2 of my filmmaking
01:10
101 series the light meter so because
01:12
I’m in the YouTube space I have access
01:13
to different types of equipment so I
01:16
guess I’ll just tell you what I’m
01:17
shooting on so right here that camera
01:18
right there if you want to look from
01:20
this angle
01:20
that’s a C 100 with a 24 72 the second
01:24
one I’m shooting this camera right here
01:27
it’s the only one you can’t see on the
01:29
5d mark ii with a 1635 2 8 and then
01:33
right here the demonstration camera is
01:35
going to be the 7d d now I never use
01:38
this comment before but the YouTube
01:41
space had it and I plugged it in and
01:43
looked it up and I really liked the
01:45
display that it has now I’ve lost
01:47
control on the back of the monitor here
01:49
when you plug into an HDMI and you go
01:52
out to a monitor you lose the control on
01:54
the back so that kind of sucks but it’s
01:57
great for what I’m trying to talk about
01:59
here so basically what you’re seeing
02:01
here is what would be on the back of the
02:03
LCD screen right here on the back of the
02:04
camera so since you should know from
02:08
watching the DSLR basic settings
02:09
tutorial here are some settings right
02:11
here it’s a little bit different from
02:13
the 5d
02:13
mark – from that video right here is the
02:15
shutter speed which is at 180 degrees
02:18
right now because I’m shooting at 24
02:19
frames per second you should know what
02:21
that means
02:22
here’s the f-stop we’re at f/8 and
02:24
here’s the ISO we’re at ISO 320 for the
02:27
demonstration purposes right now
02:29
now I didn’t mention in that video what
02:31
the light meter is and where the light
02:32
meter is this big thing right here on
02:34
the mark – it’s in a different spot but
02:36
that’s the light meter so these weird
02:39
dots and weird numbers and things so I’m
02:41
going to talk about it a lot of people
02:48
watch my DSLR basic settings tutorial
02:50
and they commented on it and said it was
02:51
the best tutorial that they ever saw
02:53
that it was well explained and all that
02:56
stuff and I have to say thank you so
02:58
much for that I’m so happy that it’s
03:01
getting through the people and that it’s
03:03
clear and that people are understanding
03:04
it and yet the whole time that video has
03:07
been up I’ve been sort of upset that I
03:10
never talked about the light meter so I
03:12
can imagine some of you out there
03:13
getting a camera for the first time
03:15
watching that tutorial and going on
03:17
taking a picture maybe something like
03:19
this oh look there’s something cool I
03:21
want to take a picture of you turn on
03:22
the camera and you’re looking at the
03:24
back of the LCD screen you’re seeing
03:25
this and you zoom in and you go okay
03:28
that’s a little dark let me do this here
03:31
okay yeah okay that looks good maybe I
03:34
should change the ISO still not bright
03:36
enough yeah that looks good okay let me
03:39
just make sure it’s in focus and boom we
03:41
take the photo right let’s take a look
03:44
at it there it is there’s the photo now
03:48
you were using the LCD screen to find
03:52
what your exposure is you were using the
03:56
brightness of the the screen itself to
03:59
tell you what the brightness of the shot
04:01
should be that’s what you do that’s its
04:06
it seems pretty obvious you know it
04:08
seems like well duh of course I’m
04:09
looking at the back of the screen it
04:11
looks like it’s the right exposure so
04:13
I’m going to take the shot now granted
04:17
with a photo you can get away with it
04:19
because photos have a lot more data in
04:21
them and you have a lot more recovery in
04:23
post for video guys they know you cannot
04:27
use the LCD screen to tell you what your
04:30
exposure is why well the screen itself
04:34
has its own brightness you can turn the
04:36
brightness up or down I could turn the
04:38
brightness of this monitor all the way
04:40
up now it’s at a hundred now if I were
04:44
to do the same thing now it looks a
04:50
little now looks too bright so now I’m
04:52
going to bring it down and then take the
04:54
photo there but what’s the real exposure
04:58
how can I tell the difference between
05:00
the inherent brightness of the monitor
05:03
and what the actual exposure of the
05:06
image that I’m seeing the light that’s
05:08
bouncing off of it and coming to the
05:09
camera how can I tell the difference
05:11
between what the LCD is showing me and
05:14
what is really actually properly exposed
05:17
according to the camera according to the
05:19
sensor that’s where the light meter
05:21
comes in or how about this what about if
05:26
you have a camera that doesn’t have an
05:28
LCD screen on it what if you have a film
05:31
camera film cameras don’t have a fancy
05:35
little box on the back to show you what
05:36
the exposure is the first camera I ever
05:39
learned photography on was a 35
05:40
millimeter film camera so this having an
05:45
LCD screen is like amazing because you
05:47
can see it right there you can see what
05:49
the exposure is now that’s true for the
05:53
new generation you don’t really need to
05:55
know about the light meter and that’s
05:57
why I didn’t put it in my last tutorial
05:59
you can get away with not having to
06:01
learn about it because we’re so spoiled
06:03
with having LCD screens but if you
06:06
really want to take this seriously
06:08
especially if you’re a videographer you
06:11
have to learn about how to get exposure
06:13
using the camera’s instruments to tell
06:15
you what that exposure is now on a film
06:17
camera the light meter was inside the
06:21
viewfinder and it’s also up here in this
06:25
little zone looks like a calculator now
06:29
the really old film cameras don’t even
06:32
have this calculators display here this
06:35
crap what is this called I’m just going
06:38
to call it a digital readout the real
06:41
the old film comers don’t have that the
06:43
light meter is inside the viewfinder and
06:46
it’s magnified so that you can you can
06:48
actually see it when you look through
06:52
now it is awesome that I’ve been a space
06:54
like this but it does kind of suck
06:56
because I’m going to be talking about
06:57
situations that photographers come up
06:59
against in real-life situations outside
07:02
you know landscapes or you know wedding
07:05
photographers or something where you
07:06
don’t have control over the lights like
07:08
I do in here so I actually had to set up
07:10
a white paper over here and I just
07:12
shined a pretty bright light on it now
07:14
let me tell you how this light meter
07:16
thing works so right now I’m just going
07:17
to fill up the frame with the very
07:19
bright part of the seamless paper there
07:21
now how do you get your exposure you
07:23
come back to this beautiful light meter
07:24
right here so in the photography world
07:26
when something’s too bright it means
07:29
there was too much light getting exposed
07:31
to the film too much light getting
07:33
exposed to the sensor or some people fur
07:35
to say it too much of the sensor being
07:39
exposed to light too much of light being
07:42
exposed to the sensor too much of the
07:43
sensor being exposed to light I don’t
07:45
care it means the same thing you can say
07:47
it both ways so when something is very
07:49
bright it is overexposed the word over
07:53
comes with a plus sign which is why we
07:56
have the plus sign over here when
07:58
something’s too dark not enough light
08:00
has gone and hit the sensor or hit the
08:02
film so it is underexposed it’s not
08:05
bright enough it’s under that’s why
08:07
there is a little minus symbol over here
08:09
so we have under exposure and over
08:12
exposure this little guy in the middle I
08:15
don’t know what it’s called it looks
08:16
pretty cool it’s like a little compass
08:18
needle this little guy in the middle
08:19
tells you that that’s properly exposed
08:22
now on DSLR cameras when you go to take
08:26
a picture you can just hit the shutter
08:28
button and take a photo but you also can
08:33
press the shutter button down halfway
08:35
you just press it a little bit now
08:37
notice what happened things changed it’s
08:39
kind of sucks to Ferrara as a first
08:41
example but I’ll go with it
08:43
right now this little arrow came up now
08:45
you can see the shots white very bright
08:48
and this is on the over side overexposed
08:51
so it’s telling us that it’s so bright
08:55
that it’s off the chart so right now I
08:58
can see my ISO is pretty high so I’m
09:00
going to take a reading again and I’m
09:02
going to put the ISO down so let’s go by
09:04
the way I love the way on the 70d the
09:06
ISO looks that’s pretty cool and it has
09:08
all the increments of 1/3 stops so
09:12
that’s cool 400 next one is 5/4 6/4
09:15
that’s really cool I really like the
09:16
design of this one of the reasons why I
09:18
chose to make the 7d d the demonstration
09:20
camera here so let’s pop down to let’s
09:23
pop down to 320 now the only thing that
09:25
sucks about that is that you can’t see
09:27
the light meter changing as you go but
09:29
hey look now we’ve got a little block
09:31
right here so it’s telling us that we’re
09:33
three stops overexposed now if you saw
09:37
the DSLR basic setting satori you know
09:38
what you know what stops are so three
09:41
stops all right well let’s just let’s
09:43
put the f-stop up to the full stop at 8
09:46
so we’re about three stops overexposed
09:48
so we’re going to have to iris down
09:51
three stops or shutter up to the
09:54
equivalent of three stops or combination
09:57
of both so let’s do a combination of
09:59
both so we’re at f/8 let’s go up one
10:01
stop one two three to f11 and then let’s
10:05
compensate with some shutter speed so
10:06
let’s go one two three and then an extra
10:10
pop up there so notice when you make a
10:12
click on the shutter speed it’s moving
10:14
one of these little dots boom one click
10:17
is one dot bomb one click is one dot
10:19
click click every one of these dots here
10:22
corresponds to a third of a stop so if
10:25
we go to overall exposure right here and
10:28
we click up one third of a stop click up
10:31
one third of a step click up that’s your
10:33
full stop that’s why there’s a 1 if we
10:35
go one two three now we’re at two now
10:38
when you’re when you press the shutter
10:41
button down halfway the sensor the
10:43
camera is giving you an active live feed
10:46
so notice if I were to hold the shutter
10:50
button down it’s getting that active
10:51
reading and I were to move the camera
10:53
way look what’s happening things popping
10:56
down active live so it’s reading that
10:59
data right now it’s reading it on the
11:01
fly so if a your if you’re at this at a
11:05
window or something and some
11:08
he walks in front of the window or a car
11:10
rolls up a truck rolls up and blocks
11:12
your shot your ex your exposure is going
11:15
to change on the fly and you should be
11:17
aware of that and find out what now the
11:19
new exposure is that’s the crazy thing
11:21
about shooting in real life outdoors in
11:24
you know natural situations is that
11:26
exposures can change on the fly a cloud
11:29
can go in front of the Sun and cover the
11:31
whole landscape in overcast that’s
11:33
totally going to change your f-stop your
11:35
that’s totally going to change your
11:36
exposure setting so if we keep it in the
11:39
bright spot make sure I’m zoomed all the
11:40
way into the bright spot it’s telling us
11:43
right now that at 125 shutter at f11 at
11:47
320 is oh this is a perfect exposure a
11:51
perfect overall exposure it’s telling
11:55
you the proper reading of light for a
11:57
proper exposure overall just imagine
12:01
this being a beautiful landscape we’re
12:04
at the top of a big hill looking down at
12:06
at the Shire there’s rolling hills and
12:09
trees can you see it it’s beautiful and
12:11
we’re taking our reading and mmm there
12:13
it is 125 f11 and 3 ISO 320 that’s going
12:18
to be a beautiful look how beautiful
12:19
that look so let’s take that photo
12:21
that’s going to be a great shot you may
12:24
have noticed if you’re really keen and
12:26
you’re really astute you may have
12:27
noticed if you were at a wedding or
12:29
something or if you’ve watched a
12:30
photographer work you may have noticed
12:32
him you know maybe walk into a new
12:34
situation he’s just inside taking photos
12:36
inside walks outside he doesn’t pick up
12:40
the camera take a photo look at the back
12:42
of the LCD screen change a setting take
12:44
a photo look at the back of the LCD
12:46
screen he’s not doing that
12:47
he walks outside into a new situation
12:48
he’s looking at his little digital
12:50
readout and he’s gone button up Nana and
12:52
he’s getting that he’s getting that
12:53
thing right at where it needs to be boom
12:55
and look I just did something quickly on
12:56
the fly I went down to f5 and 640
12:59
shutter and it’s same it’s a still a
13:01
good exposure look how fast I did that
13:03
when I’m not even thinking so you might
13:05
be in a situation where just a moment
13:07
ago you were at f4 and 4000 shutter you
13:09
walk into a new zone you look down and
13:12
ah I need some more light let me just
13:14
pop up and you go oh okay that works or
13:16
you say to yourself you know what I
13:18
really want to do a deep focus I don’t
13:20
want to do
13:21
focus so let me pop up the shutter speed
13:23
let me pop up the f-stop all the way as
13:25
high as it’ll go
13:26
and all right I got to go pretty low in
13:28
the show let me bounce up my ISO let me
13:31
see here and there boom
13:33
now you can instantly we got a super
13:37
deep focus and a proper exposure there
13:40
was no dicking around so that’s it huh
13:43
we’re done right nope let me hit you
13:46
with another situation let’s say you
13:48
just went to Vegas your hotel room is
13:50
beautiful you’ve got a great balcony it
13:52
looks great it’s a very bright day
13:53
outside you stand out on the balcony hey
13:55
let me get a picture you you and the
13:58
whole scenery behind you on your 30th
14:00
floor whatever so let’s take a look at
14:02
it see our beautiful view right here
14:04
look that’s our look at our balconies
14:06
right here and this all in the
14:08
background is the the the Empire State
14:11
Building from the New York City casino
14:13
there’s the Le Eiffel Tower right there
14:15
that pyramid thing the Luxor the
14:18
cosmopolitan building is beautiful look
14:19
at all that now let me go step onto the
14:21
balcony hey don’t I look gorgeous
14:27
now you’re going to come up against the
14:29
situation the background this beautiful
14:32
landscape is very bright it’s noon and
14:35
you’re in Vegas it’s very bright out
14:37
there so before I stepped into the frame
14:39
we got our exposure I mean take a look
14:41
at it without Brenda in the shot it’s
14:45
perfectly exposed Brenda steps in what
14:50
do we do this is where being a
14:52
photographer can suck sometimes now a
14:54
moment like this a flash would be
14:56
awesome a you know a thing you put on
14:59
your camera that goes gives you a big
15:01
burst of light I’m sure you’ve seen a
15:03
flash go off now most cameras that we
15:05
have our cellphones and stuff have them
15:07
built in some DSLRs have them built in
15:11
the 70d has one built in it’s right here
15:12
now the 5d Mark to the 5d Mark 3 do not
15:16
have flashes built in you’d have to buy
15:18
an extra one and they can be $500 $600
15:22
you can get a really cheap one for like
15:23
maybe a 150 or something but let’s say
15:27
you you’re brand new photographer
15:30
amateur photographer you got a camera
15:32
that you went for the 5d and it doesn’t
15:34
have a flash
15:35
built-in and now you’re in this
15:36
situation and that’s where being a
15:38
photographer can suck sometimes when you
15:40
get into a situation like this so you
15:42
have to ask yourself this question what
15:44
do I want to expose for sometimes you’re
15:48
going to be in situations where there’s
15:50
very high contrast now what does that
15:52
mean it means exactly that one thing in
15:55
the frame is going to be dark because
15:57
there’s no light on it and the other
15:59
thing in the frame is going to be very
16:00
bright there’s a lot of light on it and
16:03
the difference in stops is very big so
16:08
in this situation you have to ask
16:09
yourself what do I want to expose for
16:12
let’s say Brenda’s wearing a really nice
16:14
dress forget about the background it’s
16:16
there but let’s I want to see Brenda’s
16:19
face I want to see the clothes that
16:20
she’s wearing so what do we do
16:22
in this situation now cool trick that I
16:25
like to do I’m going to bring in a stunt
16:26
double
16:28
now cool trick that I like to do is when
16:30
I’m in a situation like this is now I’m
16:32
on a tripod so I’m going to take it off
16:33
watch the monitor here I like to
16:35
literally walk right up to my subject I
16:38
look I like to walk right up to my
16:40
subject zoom in on them so I’m filling
16:43
the whole frame with the part I want to
16:47
expose for now I should press the
16:49
shutter button down halfway to get my
16:51
reading and I notice that I have to do
16:55
some settings so it’s good enough for me
16:58
that’s a proper exposure right there so
17:01
let me pop back and now let me focus so
17:07
now I know that our face will be
17:10
properly exposed now that block of wood
17:12
might be the same amount of light
17:13
bouncing off it as my skin so me hop in
17:15
there see what it looks like not bad not
17:19
bad
17:19
at least we can see details we can see
17:22
the clothes so here we go set the
17:24
exposure and now we got a pretty good
17:25
photo it’s not silhouetted like it was
17:27
before so it means that you have to
17:29
decide what you want to expose for
17:31
imagine a landscape don’t you just love
17:38
my drawing so imagine this beautiful
17:39
landscape trees details and things that
17:42
you want to see the sun’s here the
17:43
stones in front of you so everything’s
17:45
kind of getting backlit and the sky is
17:47
very bright
17:48
you aim your camera at this scene and
17:50
you get a overall perfect reading here’s
17:53
the likely thing that’s going to happen
17:54
the sky is going to be exposed perfectly
17:57
but the ground is not so you have to ask
18:00
yourself what do you want to expose for
18:02
if you do want to expose for the sky I
18:04
would say tilt your camera up fill the
18:07
frame with the sky get your overall
18:10
reading come back down to where you want
18:13
to be take the photo and it’ll be a cool
18:15
silhouetted thing depending on the
18:17
lighting situation of the sky
18:19
contrasting that tilt the camera down
18:21
get rid of the sky altogether get the
18:24
camera to be about here get yours
18:26
reading for right in the middle for the
18:29
overall reading then get it back up to
18:31
where you want to be take the photo
18:33
the ground will be exposed beautifully
18:35
the sky might be a little overexposed
18:37
but maybe you can work that out in post
18:39
a week later you get back from Vegas
18:43
you’re taking a look at the photo and
18:45
you bring it into Photoshop and you can
18:48
mess with it and post the bright spots
18:50
in the back you do some recovery you
18:52
mess with levels you learn a little bit
18:54
about Photoshop you could you might be
18:56
able to bring back a lot of that detail
18:58
in the background even though you’re
19:00
exposing for the foreground the you’re
19:02
exposing for Brenda do some work to it
19:04
and you can get a better dynamic range
19:08
is what they call that when the
19:10
overexposed parts can come down and get
19:12
more into the properly exposed level and
19:15
the subject maybe was a little bit too
19:17
dark but you can then bring them up so
19:19
you’ll notice that a high dynamic range
19:22
photo tends to look flat because it’s
19:25
taking the really bright ones and
19:27
pulling them towards the middle and
19:28
taking the really dark things and
19:29
pulling them towards the middle some
19:31
people don’t like high dynamic range
19:32
they look a little too weird or too flat
19:34
some people learn too high dynamic range
19:35
so it really just depends on your taste
19:37
and your style you do however have a
19:39
better chance of recovering those
19:41
brights if you shoot in RAW rather than
19:43
shooting in JPEG so most photographers
19:46
shoot RAW all the time especially if
19:48
you’re a professional photographer if
19:50
you shoot something like this scenario
19:51
and a JPEG it’s compressing it in the
19:54
camera yeah your file size is going to
19:56
be like five megabytes as opposed to a
19:58
raw photo which is going to be like 25
20:00
megabytes
20:02
so per card per memory card you’re going
20:04
to have a lot less shots per day you
20:07
know you put in a 16 gigabyte card
20:10
you’re going to get I don’t know five
20:12
hundred photos with raw whereas with
20:14
JPEG you’re going to get two thousand
20:15
photos so you got to ask yourself what’s
20:18
the purpose of what you’re doing but
20:20
like I said if you’re in a situation
20:22
like that and you know in post I’m going
20:25
to fiddle with it to try to get the
20:26
exposure look good overall you
20:28
definitely want to shoot in RAW so that
20:30
it there’s no compression and you can
20:32
really go in there and dial in your
20:34
exposure after the fact I’m moving my
20:38
stunt double in here for another example
20:40
now some people I know are going to be
20:41
asking about video cameras now I said in
20:44
my DSLR basic settings tutorial that
20:46
everything in the tutorial will work for
20:49
any camera you have and I mention that
20:51
to my photographer friends and my
20:53
videographer friends the light meter not
20:55
necessarily the case another reason why
20:58
I left it out of that tutorial video
21:00
cameras and DSLR cameras have different
21:03
ways to show you how to get your
21:05
exposure the DSLRs have the light meter
21:08
with this beautiful thing now as far as
21:11
I know video cameras maybe they do have
21:13
it if you can turn it on but for the
21:15
most part you get your exposure with
21:17
video cameras by using your zebras what
21:21
are zebras well they’re stripes they’re
21:24
stripes
21:25
now I set this up and I have this camera
21:27
set up right here to show you my monitor
21:31
this is going to be weird in meta now I
21:33
don’t I I tend to do my tutorials
21:36
unscripted I sort of go off the cuff and
21:39
I go live and I just see where the
21:42
things take me so I didn’t know I was
21:43
going to do this otherwise I would
21:44
probably set this up in a different way
21:45
but since we’re here since we’re doing
21:47
it let’s switch over to this camera here
21:50
got my monitor right here so I can see
21:51
myself so the c100 this is a c500 did I
21:56
mention before that it was a C 185
21:58
hundred whatever so let me turn on the
22:00
zebras for you boom there they are so
22:06
once again let me show you them off
22:09
notice here there’s nothing here there’s
22:11
nothing turn them on these things pop up
22:14
now now
22:15
what are the zebras basically zebras are
22:17
telling you parts of the frame that are
22:20
exposed overexposed as opposed to under
22:23
exposed now zebras are different from
22:24
the other light meter over here whereas
22:27
this light meter tells you an overall
22:30
exposure it takes every part of the
22:33
frame mixes it together gives you an
22:36
average and then tells you where that
22:38
average is you can see the average
22:40
doesn’t really work for a situation with
22:43
Brenda because it’s the background so
22:47
bright that that is overruling the
22:48
average now that’s where zebras can come
22:51
in handy because it’s telling you
22:53
exactly what part of the frame is
22:55
exposed correctly and exposed over now
22:59
you can set your zebras to different
23:01
exposure levels right now I have these
23:03
set to 70% now that means you’ll start
23:05
to see zebras that you start to see the
23:07
stripes at 70 percent of full out full
23:12
blown out basically all the way to
23:15
peaking of in terms of hotness exposure
23:17
level so check it out I’ll mess with the
23:20
aperture right here I don’t know if you
23:22
can see it yeah you can see it right
23:23
here we’re at f9 now if i dial up see
23:28
I’m changing the f-stop now basically
23:32
it’s so blown out that you don’t even
23:35
see the Zebras anymore but so let me go
23:38
to dark so here we are now we’re
23:40
underexposed now you can see except for
23:42
the very brightest part of the frame
23:44
here you don’t see any zebras you know
23:47
what really quickly I’m going to turn
23:49
off the numbers and stuff hang on so I
23:53
turned off the numbers except for zebras
23:56
now you’ll see when I’m stopped down
23:59
really really low I’m at f-18 now let’s
24:02
pretend that that YouTube box is Brenda
24:04
it’s her face it’s our subject it’s a
24:07
thing we want to expose for this guy
24:09
right here so let’s pop up the exposure
24:11
level and I’m looking here I’m looking
24:14
to find what our exposure is here so I’m
24:17
going to go a little bit brighter I’m
24:18
going to go one third of a stop at a
24:19
time okay boom so at f11 we got nothing
24:23
at f10
24:25
we’ve got zebras and we know that it’s
24:27
about 70% of blown out
24:29
now if we keep going it’s even more and
24:32
now that’s wait that’s over that’s too
24:36
much
24:36
we’ll keep it about here that’s the safe
24:38
place to keep it if this is if this is
24:40
Brenda’s face a little bit of zebras on
24:42
the face should be okay then again in
24:44
this situation I’m actually exposing for
24:46
myself so I’m going to hop in the frame
24:48
real quick and I’m going to take a look
24:49
at myself this is how I actually set up
24:51
and I’m noticing that f9 is a little bit
24:54
better so f10 f10 I mean this is not
24:58
what I was set up before this is totally
24:59
acceptable but I prefer just a little
25:02
bit you can see on the you can see on
25:03
this camera there’s not really any
25:05
zebras except for the super bright spots
25:07
at the top ahead from the backlight but
25:10
let me go to f9 part I had it set up
25:12
before take a look at that
25:14
yep ever so slightly on my nose and a
25:17
little bit more on my head but I like
25:19
this exposure just a little bit better
25:20
you can also notice looking at the
25:22
monitor that the board behind me which I
25:26
have not really used as much as the
25:27
other tutorial now you can see that’s
25:29
blowing out oh wow that’s cool look at
25:32
that but once again you have to ask
25:34
yourself what are you exposing for I
25:37
want to expose for faces usually in the
25:39
video world you’re exposing for faces
25:42
it’s also really important to have your
25:44
exposure dead-on with a video camera
25:47
because for the most part there’s less
25:50
to work with in post a camera on raw one
25:53
frame one single frame is a 20 megabyte
25:56
file now if that were the case with
25:58
every video camera this footage would be
26:02
uncompressed and raw would be gigabyte
26:05
singing about hundreds of gigabytes just
26:06
to do a few minutes so every video
26:09
camera one of the other reasons why
26:10
video cameras are very expensive is
26:12
because there’s a lot of thought put
26:14
into the processing power and the
26:16
compression that happens on the fly it’s
26:18
why the cameras also get very hot
26:19
because it’s doing lots of processing
26:22
literally mathematical equations to
26:24
figure out the best way to compress it
26:26
taking parts of the image that are
26:28
static and throwing them away and taking
26:30
other parts of the things that aren’t
26:32
static and movement and making sure that
26:33
that’s in there and having the best
26:35
quality image with video cameras it’s
26:37
all about compressions so that’s great
26:40
in terms of ease of post-production
26:42
because
26:42
there isn’t hundreds and hundreds of
26:44
gigabytes worth of footage to go through
26:46
and have to deal with and store but the
26:48
content is that we have less latitude to
26:51
work with in post a situation with
26:53
Brenda where the backgrounds extremely
26:55
bright and the subject is very dark for
26:58
a photographer not too much of a problem
27:00
should it in raw work within a post
27:02
you’ll be okay for a videographer using
27:04
these kinds of cameras shooting in HD in
27:06
1080i it’s gonna be difficult you really
27:11
need to get some light on them you got
27:12
to get a reflector bounce some light
27:13
back into them you need to find some
27:16
lights now flash isn’t going to work
27:17
because the flesh is only one shot
27:19
you’re going to need some continuous
27:20
lighting another reason why videography
27:22
is a is harder than photography in my
27:25
humble opinion now there are other
27:26
cameras out there like the red that
27:28
shoot in RAW which you’re dealing with
27:31
hundreds and hundreds of gigabytes worth
27:33
of footage and but the great thing about
27:35
those cameras that shoot in RAW is that
27:37
you have excellent capabilities in post
27:39
to do an amazing color grade and make it
27:42
look really great in post Cody in my
27:44
film that we shot called the homeless
27:46
which is going to be up online in July
27:49
I’ll link to it here when it’s up we
27:52
shot that on the red scarlet in raw and
27:55
Cody spent a month color grading it
27:58
every scene taking his time and going in
28:00
there and taking the greens and pulling
28:02
them up and taking the the other colors
28:04
and bringing them down and doing a lot
28:06
of stuff for every single scene as a
28:08
cinematographer that’s nice because if
28:10
something’s a little over something’s a
28:12
little under and we’re shooting in RAW
28:13
we can fix it later
28:15
but with a video camera knowing your
28:17
exposure and knowing how to use your
28:19
camera’s light meter and zebras is
28:22
essential now in the cinematography
28:24
world there are actually other ways to
28:27
get your exposure as well in the
28:29
photography of DSLR world as well so one
28:31
other way is to use a histogram on a
28:33
DSLR is if you hit the info button a
28:36
bunch of other settings come up I mean I
28:38
could go through them picture style
28:39
Kelvin temperature recording from a
28:41
table hit info again here’s your
28:43
histogram
28:44
I admit I do not use histograms very
28:46
often so what I know I know from just
28:49
learning from other photographers I’ve
28:51
talked to but the basic gist of it is at
28:53
this end of the spectrum are your black
28:55
and at this end of the spectrum are your
28:57
whites so what you’re seeing here is a
29:00
live view of the picture
29:02
so basically its complete black here
29:05
complete white here and then here’s zero
29:07
amount and a hundred percent amount what
29:10
this part of the histogram represents
29:11
over here is basically pure black now
29:14
how much of this screen is pure black
29:16
none of it is except for maybe this area
29:19
here but even that that’s not even pure
29:21
black so as represented on the histogram
29:24
there’s nothing there
29:27
whereas contrastingly a lot of the frame
29:29
is white and because I’m exposed for the
29:32
thing here I’m exposed for the the Apple
29:34
box
29:34
not only is most of the frame white but
29:36
most of the frame is white and
29:37
overexposed like too bright 100% if this
29:41
was a video it’d be really hard to bring
29:43
that back if this was raw a picture it’s
29:45
still going to be tough so you can see
29:47
that over here the very very white
29:49
pixels are there’s a hundred percent of
29:52
them right there if I were to move
29:53
around you can see changes so what
29:55
speaking off-the-charts here is it
29:56
somewhere around I would say like 70
30:00
percent gray there’s a lot of that in
30:02
the frame now if I were to actually tilt
30:05
up to the ceiling where it’s completely
30:06
dark now you can see there’s nothing
30:08
elsewhere except for right here
30:10
so histogram is a way to tell what your
30:14
exposure levels are for me it’s more
30:17
about just knowing what’s all white
30:19
what’s all black for me I don’t use
30:21
histograms very often histogram might
30:23
not actually be a way to tell you what
30:25
you’re like overall exposure is but at
30:27
least it can tell you without a doubt if
30:29
something is blown out or if something’s
30:31
way too dark it’s just a great way to
30:33
see you know what really the sensor is
30:36
in taking when you’re reading this shot
30:39
there’s another way to tell exposure
30:40
that you get access to using the Reds
30:43
using special monitors or using
30:46
something like the ninja blade or the
30:48
Shogun or sort of external monitors that
30:52
are also recorders and that’s called
30:54
false color I can go into depth talking
30:56
about false color I love using false
30:58
color but I don’t have access to it
31:00
right now right here in the YouTube
31:01
space so I’m going to skip it for now
31:03
but maybe it could be something that we
31:04
can talk about in a future video I’m
31:06
sure there are a bunch of other ways to
31:07
tell what your exposure is but the
31:09
last one I’m going to talk about is
31:10
actually using a light meter now I did a
31:14
review of the luma light meter you can
31:16
check it out right here if you click
31:17
here but I’d give you a warning when I
31:20
reviewed that light meter only the photo
31:23
app was available at the time now the
31:25
video app is out so I should do another
31:27
review of that with the video app
31:30
because I actually love it now
31:31
to be honest I forgot it today and it’s
31:34
actually a good thing I think because it
31:36
forced me to use other ways to tell
31:38
exposure which helped me out in this
31:40
tutorial so I’ll just have to talk about
31:42
the theory of it if you check out the
31:43
review right here you’ll see what the
31:45
light meter is it’s a little white
31:46
hemisphere that you hold in places and
31:49
it tells you the light the great thing
31:51
about that kind of light meter is that
31:53
it’s very specific you set your frame
31:55
rate 24 frames a second you set your ISO
31:58
you tell it what ISO you’re at and you
32:00
tell it what shutter speed you’re at you
32:02
walk over to your subject I’m walking
32:04
over to Brenda again you take the
32:07
reading and it will tell you what f-stop
32:08
you’re at which is awesome now you might
32:11
have the question if you have false
32:13
color if you have zebras if you have
32:15
this beautiful light meter why even use
32:17
a light meter well I’ll call it a spot
32:19
meter because that’s what you’re doing
32:21
you’re putting it on spots correct me if
32:24
that’s wrong but I think those little
32:25
handheld light meters can be referred to
32:27
as spot meters not too sure what I love
32:29
about those spot meters those light
32:31
meters is that if I have two contrasting
32:35
areas for instance here and here
32:38
I love taking my light meter walking up
32:42
to a spot putting in my frame rate ISO
32:44
all that stuff and I put it right here
32:46
and I go oh wow okay so at 24 frames per
32:50
second at 320 ISO this is an F 11 then I
32:55
go over here and go whoo okay this is an
32:58
f4 how many stops is that four five
33:00
point six eight that’s three stops right
33:04
four one two three three three yeah boom
33:08
nailed it so that would tell me that
33:09
that’s three whole stops difference
33:11
between the two where that comes in
33:13
handy as well as you get to know your
33:14
camera’s some cameras especially like
33:17
the older DSLRs like the 7d in the 5d
33:19
mark ii they don’t like it when things
33:21
are that far apart contrastingly they
33:23
if you’re going for a contrast you look
33:25
one-stop is good enough otherwise the
33:28
camera just can’t see that side at all
33:31
cameras are getting better but cameras
33:34
do not see as well as our eyes do and
33:37
you’re going to learn that right off the
33:38
bat when you’re taking photos I can see
33:41
with my eyes the difference is between
33:42
here and here I’m looking at it with my
33:44
own eyes I can see all the details in
33:46
both you turn a camera on it it’s one or
33:49
the other you’re either going to see
33:51
details in the exposed the the bright
33:53
area or you’re going to see details in
33:55
the dark hair you got a pick one that’s
33:57
one conundrum of being a photographer or
33:59
videographer is that are I see better in
34:02
a way our eyes have much better contrast
34:04
range dynamic range than cameras do so
34:07
knowing that if you walk up and take a
34:09
reading and it’s three stops difference
34:10
might want to try and even it out a
34:12
little bit more try to make it only a
34:13
stop difference depending on the camera
34:15
if we’re shooting the red in RAW three
34:18
stops ain’t so bad and a lot of times
34:20
when you read about cameras you’ll hear
34:22
oh this has 15 stops of dynamic range
34:25
that’s true but I mean it’s scary do you
34:29
really want the bright thing to be 10
34:32
stops brighter than the other thing
34:33
that’s a little crazy for me I think
34:35
it’s more just in the raw you have a lot
34:37
to work with you can make things very
34:39
dynamic and post but I wouldn’t rely
34:41
heavily on 15 stops of dynamic range
34:44
well that’s about it guys so I think
34:45
just as a quick closing statement the
34:47
light meter I didn’t do in the first one
34:49
because you can get by without it but
34:51
now that you know a little bit more
34:52
about it you’ve taken another step
34:54
towards learning about this art form and
34:56
being able to do what you want to do
34:58
more efficiently and a little bit faster
35:01
and remember it all comes back to your
35:03
style now that you know a little bit
35:04
more about how to use the light meter
35:06
and choosing what you want to expose for
35:09
you have another trick up your sleeve
35:10
and another tool in your toolbox that
35:12
you can use to achieve your vision thank
35:14
you so much for watching what do you
35:16
think should be next in my filmmaking
35:18
101 series what’s the next thing that
35:20
should be the next step on your way to
35:23
becoming a master photographer or
35:24
videographer let me know in the comments
35:26
below I’ll check them out and I’ll
35:28
decide which should be next in my
35:29
filmmaking 101 series I don’t just do
35:32
tutorials here I do product reviews
35:34
question and answers and coming soon I
35:37
have
35:37
ideas to do an interview show with
35:39
friends cohorts colleagues and just
35:42
people that I think have really good
35:44
insight into the filmmaking career so
35:46
stay tuned for that and also now that I
35:47
have the YouTube space unlocked I’m
35:49
going to be trying to put out videos at
35:51
least once a month maybe twice a month
35:53
so please subscribe if you haven’t
35:55
already I’m just about to hit 40,000
35:57
subscribers so thank you so much and as
36:00
always happy filmmaking peace
36:11
you

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *