Lighting Operation and Control

 Creative Commons image film set by Alex Lang
Creative Commons image film set by Alex Lang

Goal

  • Understand and use common lighting techniques

Light Temperature in Kelvin

Temperature Source
1700 K Match flame, low pressure sodium lamps (LPS/SOX)
1850 K Candle flame, sunset/sunrise
2400 K Standard incandescent lamps
2550 K Soft white incandescent lamps
2700 K “Soft white” compact fluorescent and LED lamps
3000 K Warm white compact fluorescent and LED lamps
3200 K Studio lamps, photofloods, etc.
3350 K Studio “CP” light
4100 – 4150 K Moonlight[2]
5000 K Horizon daylight
5000 K Tubular fluorescent lamps or cool white/ daylightcompact fluorescent lamps (CFL)
5500 – 6000 K Vertical daylight, electronic flash
6200 K Xenon short-arc lamp[3]
6500 K Daylight, overcast
6500 – 9500 K LCD or CRT screen
15,000 – 27,000 K Clear blue poleward sky
These temperatures are merely characteristic;
considerable variation may be present.

– Color temperature chart from Wikipedia

Standards, Terms, and Concepts

  • Demonstrate size and distance of the light from the subject creates the type of light and shadow
  • Define:
    • Three point lighting
      1. Key light
      2. Fill light
      3. Back / Kicker / Hair light
    • Naturalism and Pictorialism
    • Ambient light
    • High-key
    • Low-key
    • Properties of Light
      • Intensity
      • Color
      • Quality
      • Angle
    • Additive and Subtractive light
    • Contrast and Lighting Ratios
      • Modeling
      • Stops
      • Key side
      • Fill side
      • Contrast Ratio
    • Direct light
    • Hard light
    • Indirect light
    • Soft light
    • Defined shadows
    • Softer edge shadows
    • Light temperature in kelvin
      • Daily light:
        • Morning / evening sun
        • Mid-day sun
        • Overcast
      • LCD screen
      • Florescent
      • Moonlight
      • Tungsten
      • LED light
      • Standard incandescent light bulb
      • Candle light
      • Match light
    • Diffusion
    • Specular highlight
    • Soft box
    • Bounce, bounce card, reflector
    • Ceiling bounce
    • Front light bounce
    • Barn doors
    • Gelatin filters

Product

  • Blog post with embedded video from YouTube of the various lighting techniques demonstrated and explained

Examples

  • Coming soon…

Steps

  1. Watch trailer for Hugo (2011) – Won Oscar for Best Cinematography
    • Check out the lighting
  2. Create blog post titled, Lighting Operation and Control
    • Create headings for:
      • Summary
      • Terms and Concepts
      • Timeline
      • Project Skills Evidence
      • What I Learned
  3. Read and take notes Lighting – KODAK Motion Picture Film (PDF)
  4. Examine Basic Scene Lighting examples (PDF)
  5. Watch and take notes from Filmmaking 101 – Three Point Lighting Tutorial – DiCasaFilm (10:18)
  6. Watch and take notes from 20 Lighting Tutorials for Film and Video – FilmMakerIQ
  7. Watch and take notes from Lighting 101: Quality of Light – RocketJump Film School (7:24)
  8. Watch and take notes from Bounce Lighting 101 | Cinematography Lighting Techniques and Tips – Cinematography Database (7:02)
  9. Write a script for your documentary film about basic lighting operations include all terms and concepts to be included in your short film
    • The point of the film is to demonstrate what you have learned about basic lighting operations as a reference for yourself in your blog
  10. Storyboard each shot
  11. Block each shot
  12. Create a shot list
  13. Create an equipment list
  14. Practice each shot, update script, as needed
  15. Gather equipment; camera, lens, shotgun mic, lights, bounce, diffuser, etc.
  16. Create a shot log
  17. Shoot each scene
  18. Catalog shots
  19. Edit shots in either YouTube Video, iMovie, or Adobe Premiere editors

Tools

Resources


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