Film Production – Cinematographer’s Journal

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A cinematographer’s portfolio will be focused on the production stage more than most other roles. Since the responsibilities of the cinematographer involve the creation of the image – both in terms of camera angle and movement and lighting, much of the cinematographer’s work will take place during the shoot. – Film Assessment Clarification Document 2015 (PDF)

Goal

  • Create a journal documenting each stage of film production

Product

  • Create blog posts (3 total) with embedded media evidence for each of three production stages.

Examples

Explanation

  • Students need to conduct extensive research for the IB Film projects and need experience moving through the workflow of producing films

Production Steps Evidence Requirements

Pre-production Blog Post

Include all of the the following requirements as evidence in your blog post:

  • Test shoots using different focal lengths, camera placement, and so on
  • Lighting tests in the actual locations
  • Checklist of equipment for the shoot
  • Evidence of collaboration with the director to negotiate how mise en scène, locations and lighting will be handled
  • Documented workflow showing your set-up sequence
  • Map of each location showing camera placement/camera movement
  • Notations on storyboards
  • Map of each location showing lighting
  • Map of each location showing character blocking/movement

Production Blog Post

Include all of the the following requirements as evidence in your blog post:

  • Evidence of camera preparation, movement, angles, shot design (the main focus of this role)
  • Description of choices made when selecting shot types with justifications
  • Evidence of how lighting design was used to create mood, atmosphere, and perhaps even genre
  • Evidence of consultation with the editor about the coverage needs for the film
  • Evidence of alternative shots and why you chose the one used in the final film
  • Identification of problems encountered during shooting and how you solved them
  • An evaluation of your camerawork and lighting on an artistic level as well as technical level
  • Identification of influences from films you have seen – name the cinematographer

Post-production Blog Post

Include all of the the following requirements as evidence in your blog post:

  • Evidence of continued contribution with director and editor through advice, assistance and any scheduled re-shoots as a result of the editing process
  • Consideration of how your film could have been improved (without blaming equipment or other people involved)

Schedule

  • Week 1
    • Create a blog post titled, PROJECT NAME Film Pre-Production – Cinematographer’s Journal
      • Create headings for:
        • Summary
        • Test Shots
        • Lighting Tests
        • Equipment Checklist
        • Collaboration with Director
        • Set-up Sequence Workflow
        • Map of Each Location
        • Storyboard Notation
        • What I Learned
    • Research material …
    • Explore and select the Cinematic Storytelling conventions you want to highlight in the film from the resources section below for the film
    • Fill in evidence for each heading of the blog post
    • Publish blog post
  • Week 2
    • Create a blog post titled, PROJECT NAME Film Production – Cinematographer’s Journal
      • Create headings for:
        • Summary
        • Camera Evidence
        • Shot Choice Justification
        • Lighting Design
        • Consultation with Editor
        • Alternative Shots
        • Camera Work and Lighting Evaluation
        • Influences from Films
        • What I Learned and Problems I Solved
    • Assistin filming script, making changes to the script as necessary
    • Fill in evidence for each heading of the blog post
    • Publish blog post
  • Week 3
    • Create a blog post titled, PROJECT NAME Film Post-Production – Cinematographer’s Journal
      • Create headings for:
        • Summary
        • Evidence of Further Contribution
        • How I Could Have Improved The Film
        • What I Learned
    • Assist in editing the film
    • Fill in evidence for each heading of the blog post
    • Publish blog post

Film Language Resources

  • Film language research from Cinematic Storytelling by Jennifer Van Sijll
    • Cinematic Storytelling book and web site
      • 9. Camera Lenses
        • 52. Wide-Angle
        • 53. Wide-Angle (Vista and Establishing Shots)
        • 54. Telephoto
        • 55. Fisheye
        • 56. Prop Lenses within the Scene (Fisheye)
        • 57. Objects
      • 10. Camera Position 
        • 58. Close-up (CU)
        • 59. Extreme Close-up (ECU)
        • 60. Two-Shot
        • 61. Over-the-Shoulder Shot (OTS)
        • 63. Point-of-View (POV)
        • 64. High-Angle
        • 65. Low-Angle
        • 66. Hi-Lo Combined
      • 11. Camera Motion
        • 67. Static Shot
        • 68. Pan
        • 69. Tilt-Up (Character)
        • 70. Tilt-Down
        • 71. Rotation
        • 72. Tracking Shot
        • 73. Circular
        • 74. Push In – Push Out
        • 75. Crane
        • 77. Handheld
        • 78. Steadicam
        • 79. Aerial
      • 12. Lighting
        • 80. Rembrandt Lighting (Light versus Dark)
        • 81. TV Lighting
        • 82. Candlelight
        • 83. Motivated Lighting
        • 84. Unmotivated Light
        • 85. Motion

Other Resources

Tools

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